Two Scholar-Performers Bring Global Perspectives to Musicology Faculty

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The School of Music welcomes the addition of two new faculty members in Musicology, beginning in the fall of 2019. 

Makoto Harris Takao is a musicologist, early modern historian, and player of the viol who works on Japan’s relationship with Christianity from the sixteenth century to the present day. 

Carlos Roberto Ramírez is a musicologist and harpsichordist whose primary research area is the study of Early Modern music and culture, focusing on the convergence of musical practice, organology, the history of the book, and subjectivity from 1350 to 1750. 

Gabriel Solis, chair of musicology, says: "This is a major step for our program in musicology. With these hires we have added two exceptional faculty to a program with a long commitment to serious study of music's social and historical significance world-wide".

Makoto Harris Takao As a doctoral fellow with the Australian Research Council Centre for the History of Emotions, Makoto Harris Takao completed a joint PhD in musicology and history at the University of Western Australia. Since 2016, Makoto has been based in Berlin where he has held a research fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development. During his time in Germany, he has also taught as a core faculty member of the Master’s program in Global History at the Freie Universität. Makoto’s interdisciplinary research spans the study of European early music and theater, Japanese studies, emotions history, and religious studies. Makoto has published articles with Early Music, the Journal of Jesuit Studies, and the Journal of Religious History, as well as book chapters on the intersection of Catholicism and the performing arts. His current book project is entitled Of Mission and Music: Japanese Christianity and Its Reflection in Early Modern Europe.

Carlos Roberto RamírezCarlos Roberto Ramírez is a musicologist and harpsichordist whose primary research area is the study of Early Modern music and culture, focusing on the convergence of musical practice, organology, the history of the book, and subjectivity from 1350 to 1750.  Carlos’s secondary research area examines representations of gender, class, and race in Latinx musics, exploring the interaction of structures of power and subject-formation in the genre of reggaeton. An ardent advocate for the combination of musical practice and scholarship, Carlos performs regularly and has had the opportunity to study historically informed practice with some of the leading exponents in the field such as Christopher Hogwood, Jordi Savall, Neal Zaslaw, Annette Richards, and Joyce Lindorff. He has presented his research at a number of conferences, including the American Musicological Society (AMS), the Symposium of the International Festival of Spanish Keyboard Music (FIMTE), the Royal Musical Association (RMA), Columbia University, and Princeton University. Carlos is a Ph.D. candidate in Musicology at Cornell University, and a Pre-Doctoral Diversity Fellow in Music at Ithaca College.

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